5 Stupid Questions With Ground

Mike Mayo plays guitar for South jersey Fake/Grind band Ground. He is a former member of legendary slam metal outfit Waking The Cadaver. Below you can check out our 5 stupid question interview to learn everything you don't care about!

Gene: Alright, I’ve known you personally for like 3 years so I gotta ask: how do you pronounce your last name? Is it Mayo as in mayonnaise? Or is it “My-oh” as in “My oh my there are a lot of birds out this morning?”
Mike: It's Mayo like the white shit you put on the sandwich. Fuck miracle whip.

Gene: You are a registered nurse? Or you’re studying to be one? I can’t remember. How much of that involves inserting things into people’s butts?
Mike: Im a tech, which is like a nurse except I'm not allowed to insert anything in anyone's butt, and I make less than half of what they make. I am studying to become an RN, so in about one year I'll legally be able to administer medication rectally. I can't wait. 

Gene: Rumor has it you moonlight as an rapper/hip hopper. How much would you say you are inspired by Vanilla Ice?
Mike: Vanilla Ice not so much, but all my friends love rap so there has always been an influence of rap on me. I like to rap for fun but it's not very good.

Gene: For real, I don’t hear a lot of modern metal/hardcore bands do the whole open note breakdown thing, just the monochromatic stuff that sounds lame in my opinion. I think that’s partially what makes Ground so fucking heavy. What are your thoughts?
Mike: Thanks! I wanted Ground to be every fat hardcore crowdkiller's favorite grindcore band when we started. I think we are doing a pretty decent job at pissing off the purists and quite frankly, that's the best part about false grind.

Gene: Did you ever find Bugs Bunny attractive when he put on a dress and played a girl bunny?Mike: No, but Jessica Rabbit could totally get it.

Ground: Bandcamp // Facebook // YouTube

5 Stupid Questions With Full Of Hell

Spencer Hazard plays guitar in Full Of Hell, a Death/Grind band from Maryland who are currently conquering the world. Check out our interview below to get answers to our 5 stupid questions!

Gene: So, first of all, does anyone call you “Spenny”? Can I call you Spenny?
Spencer: Some girl in high school always used to call me that. 

Gene: So Spenny, I’m a big fan of your band but aren’t you all worried that having the word “Hell” in your name might offend some of your Christian audience? Have you guys discussed going by “Full Of Heck?”
Spencer: We usually go by Full of Heck on Sundays. 

Gene: Did you know that “Arby’s” is actually an elongated version of “R.B.’s” which originally stood for “Roast Beef?” Isn’t that crazy? So weird.
Spencer: I did recently find that out. Arby's is one of my top favorite fast food restaurants. It's pretty expensive though, so I only go when I'm feeling classy. 

Gene: Aside from creating dynamic and constantly evolving music, your band also has an interesting aesthetic visually for your album covers and merchandise. I’m curious as to what visual influences your band has?
Spencer: For me personally the visuals are almost as important to the music. We take a lot of inspiration from early death metal, early Grindcore and industrial for the visuals. Three of my favorite bands, Swans,Man is the Bastard, and Gism, are not just my favorite bands musically, but aesthetically as well. I feel as though their art represents their music perfectly and catches your eye without being too flashy. That's reason why we've gone with Mark McCoy for our newest record and the record with Merzbow. We love all the art he has done for his label,Youth Attack, and the way he presents it. It's all very stylized and has a certain aesthetic too it. 

Gene: Yo, how great are long sleeve shirts? I fux with them so hard. Normally I like to show the guns off but I make an exception whenever I have my Coffins long sleeve clean
Spencer: They're pretty cool. I now basically switch between long sleeves and shirts with the sleeves cut off. 

Full Of Hell: Facebook // Bandcamp

5 Stupid Questions With Fuck The Facts

Melanie Mongeon does vocals for Ottawa’s Fuck The Facts, one of the world’s premiere Grindcore bands. Check out our 5 stupid questions interview down below!

Gene: I gotta ask, what is with the name? What did the facts ever do to you? Why are you angry at them? LMAO BET YOU’VE NEVER BEEN ASKED THIS BEFORE!
Melanie: Topon is the one that picked the band name when the band was still only his solo project. It is a song title from a John Zorn recording. For him, the name reflected a certain freedom in music styles he wanted to have with that new project. As for the facts in general, i like them and we need them. With the general overload of information and disinformation we are surrounded by in the various media forms, they are sometimes hard to find!  
 
Gene: Your band’s early material used Mullets as one of it’s central thematic devices. If you had to make your next album about a particular haircut, which one would it be?
Melanie: Still a mullet. Seriously, it is hard to beat. But if really have to pick another one, i guess it could be faux hawk. Someone needs to start a band called faux hawk. I googled quicky and found a Fauxhawk band.. too late for me I guess!

 
Gene:
You guys have free health care in Canada. Do you find that this makes you more reckless with your personal health? Do you get on a motorcycle and are just like “I don’t need a fuckin’ helmet, I got socialized health coverage, HIGH FIVE!”?I
Melanie: I can only speak for myself, I will keep on my helmet when on my bike. Free healthcare, I don't think it makes us more or less reckless and I personally prefer being safe. On the other hand I have always wondered, why are some people not wearing helmets on motorcycles in certain US states. As a Canadian, it blows my mind.
 
Gene: Full Disclosure: Fuck The Facts is one of my favorite bands and “Disgorge Mexico” is one of my all time favorite albums. What was the inspiration for that album, both musically and lyrically?
Melanie: Thanks! For the music, Topon and Vil wrote it together, and I added lyrics after it. It was just the 3 of us from the writing process to the studio. The artwork relates the tale of a travel from the canadian border to the mexican border.  
 
Gene: The only time I went to Canada I went to the Perkins in Niagra (Perkins is the Canadien version of Dennys). Have you been to that Perkins? If so, what is your favorite dish?
Melanie: Never been to Perkins, but we also have Denny's here. I went once to Denny's when i was younger and could barely speak english (i'm francophone). Back then, I figured that it was what the English Canadians liked to eat : just alright overpriced food. I haven't been since. But i have been to Waffle House in the US... nothing memorable there, but price was more in my touring budget then at Denny's.

Fuck The Facts: Bandcamp // Facebook // Twitter // Instagram

5 Stupid Questions With Downtrodder

Downtrodder are a 4-piece from Philadelphia that play post-hardcore, but not that stupid mallcore crap. Check out our 5 Stupid questions interview with them down below!

Gene: First of all, as a band, as a group of musicians playing music with such passion and vigor, I have to ask: who let the dogs out? What is the prevailing theory you all have? 
Downtrodder: Our sense, based on a vivid remembering of a book we read in middle school, George Orwell's Animal Farm (the literal bible for folks who want to force an argument about politics in crowded basements while a band is playing), is that the dogs were actually enforcers of an illegitimate authoritarian regime and that the Baha Men were trying to warn any farm animals in the area that a raid was in effect. The idea that the dogs themselves were some sort of metaphor for authoritarian communist rule is incorrect however, as these dogs were literal cop-dogs. The fact the the song was such a hit speaks to the scientific value of  the Top 40 radio chart as a barometer for increasing "woke-ness" among the teenage population in the new millennium years (consider as well the contribution of Eiffel 65's "I'm Blue" to the advent of neoliberal disdain for green party candidates). Had memes been popular back then, we may well have experienced a full-on political revolution. 

Gene: Ketchup, mustard or mayo? No, you can’t be edgy and say “relish”. These are the only three possible answers. And don’t ask what you’re putting it on, that’s irrelevant.
DT: We don't eat food, sorry.

Gene: What was your favorite Playstation 1 video game? And why was it Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater?
DT: This is nonsense, Gene. The greatest game for the system you mentioned was, and always will be Toby Hank's Pro Blader 2. 8 wheels were always better than four in the scientific community we were all raised in. We constantly fought over who would get to play as Campbell Cream, and groaned whenever we had to settle for Bam Bam Marinara or Ryan NyQuil. 

Gene: I feel like you guys have gotten both heavier and more melodic since I last saw you guys in 2016. Has this been a conscious artistic decision or just something that came about naturally?
DT: I think it is a little of both. With our lyrical message becoming more and more direct and deliberate with every song, it seemed fitting to add a bit of depth and grace to the sound rather than stick to a kind of sonic assault. We try to make our songs more textured and pensive than the last and we're really happy with what we've been developing. Thanks for noticing!

Gene: When you buy a movie ticket and they say “Enjoy the movie,” do you ever say “You too!” and feel like an idiot?
DT: Yeah. All the time, and in many different scenarios. Especially when the woman at the front desk shouts that the Star Wars young adult novels I checked out are overdue as I woefully drag myself out of the public library after using their free internet connection to google all the nice things Pitchfork and Noisey are saying about our band. So embarrassing.

Downtrodder: Bandcamp // Facebook

5 Stupid Questions With Cosmic Bong Destroyer

Ian Carlucci plays bass for Boston’s Cosmic Bong Destroyer and is an active member in booking Metal and Hardcore shows up and down the East Coast, check out our 5 stupid questions interview with him below!
 
Gene: Your last name is Carlucci, which is very Italian. I gotta ask, which do you prefer A MOOZARELLA OR A PROVOLONA? EH, GABAGOOL, IM WALKIN OVER HERE! VINNI VIDI VICCI, OH!
Ian: Mozzarella, all the way, and I'm not familiar with the rest of what you're trying to say, I'm not fluent in South Philly 

Gene: Your band has the word “Cosmic” in it. Have you ever been to space? What was it like? Did you meet George Clooney there?
Ian: Yes, all three of us have been to space. Myself, our drummer Billy Smith, and guitarist Erik Ameden. It used to be cool until all the hipsters started moving in and gentrification kind of screwed it all up. $5 for a coffee at Starbucks? Fuggetaboutit. I did, briefly run into George Clooney and was dying for an autograph, but seeing as that he was in a frolicking threesome with LeVar Burton and that guy who plays bass for Hoobastank, I chose to leave him be. 

Gene: I’ve noticed in photos that your guitar only has four strings. What up wit dat?
Ian: I had six strings at one point, but two were borrowed from Hannibal Burress so that he could fix the Brooklyn Bridge. It was all over the news. 

Gene: What is the general concept behind Cosmic Bong Destroyer both musically and lyrically?
Ian: The lyrics behind our music vary between the three of us, as we all contribute vocals and write lyrics for different songs. Erik and Billy are both very into the lighthearted lyrical qualities of crossover thrash bands such as Municipal Waste, and often write about smoking marijuana, in very over-the-top and crazy mannerisms, such as "Weedwacked" and "Bubonic Chronic." I have always been a diehard of really extreme bands and have penned lyrics for songs such as "Burial Cult" and "Cosmic Shock," where I take to exploring themes related to the occult, horror, sci-fi and use this as an avenue to vent my frustrations. 

Musically, at our heart we're a thrash metal band, but all of us have different tastes in music and it comes together in a really fun and dynamic way. If there ever was a textbook photo of what a real deal thrash metal kid looks like, you would probably see a photo of Erik. He's way into bands like Iron Reagan, Ghoul, but he also really loves bands like Acid Bath, Stoned Jesus and Alice In Chains (whom we probably listen to the most when all three of us are together). Billy is way into progressive metal and math rock type shit, like Car Bomb, The Dillinger Escape Plan, Periphery, and stuff of the like. Myself, I'm a blast beat fiend at heart and my favorite bands are Ulver, Spazz, Exhumed, Assuck, but I'm also way into weird shit like Lightning Bolt. 
 
The way this all comes together translates into really punchy music that takes on a gross, extreme vibe, however we don't tend to pigeonhole ourselves because the three of us are all the best of friends and we're all pretty willing to take off in whatever direction feels fun for us. Demo 2017: Live at Ratsnest has served as a decent showcase of old material in a pretty raw format, and we have a ton more material to be released that's pushing our sound in all kinds of different directions. 

Gene: Do u like me? Y/N/Angery React
Ian: It's a love/hate sort of thing. Depends on the day, what phase the moon is in, whether or not those idiot college kids at the cafe down the street get my coffee the way I like it. 

Cosmic Bong Destroyer: Bandcamp

5 Stupid Questions With Pig Destroyer

Below is an interview with Blake Harrison from Pig Destroyer, as our new interview series gets underway, check out these 5 stupid questions below! Blake Harrison does sampling and power electronics for legendary Grindcore band Pig Destroyer. He also used to play in Hatebeak, a Death Metal band with a parrot lead singer.
 
Gene: First of all, what’s the deal with airline food? Like, seriously, what is the deal?
Blake: This is a tough one. United just made Bobby Flay their caterer, so they decided to punish their travelers in a different way.
 
Gene: A few weeks ago I logged onto Facebook and saw that you were selling your beanie baby collection and noticed you said that “most of them still had the tags on.” My question is, why do those things still have the tags? Aren’t you too Metal for the tags?
Blake: By "Beanie Babies" I meant heroin, and by tags I meant "kilos."
 
Gene: Do you ever get so relaxed in public that you unwillingly let a fart loose, and then desperately try to ignore the smell, even though it’s very obvious that it has hit the nostrils of the people around you?
Blake: Doesn't everyone?

Gene: On the Pig D albums, how much input do you personally have over the noise and effects interludes? Do you have any influence over the actual songs or overall “arc” of each album?
Blake: All of the input, on the new one, I should have a more noticeable role. The arc of the record is kind of its own thing, it influences you, not the other way around, but I try to cater my stuff to fit the lyrics or the vibe
 
Gene: What ever happened to Fergie? She was so talented! How does someone disappear like that? Didn’t the Black Eyed Peas play the Superbowl halftime show a few years ago? Damn, time just flies.
Blake: The real question here, is has anyone ever seems Fergie and Guy Fieri in the same room?
 
Blake: Also, I'm still in Hatebeak.

Pig Destroyer: Bandcamp // Facebook // Twitter // Instagram

5 Stupid Questions with YOUR ENEMY

5 Stupid Questions for Samantha Hernandez of Your Enemy. Samantha plays guitar in Your Enemy and also does vocals for Antagonizer, both devastating Grindcore bands from Oakland. Check it out below!
 
Gene: So I know you probably get asked this a lot but, why don’t you go by “Ur Enemy”? What do you all have against breevs?
Samantha: Tbh we couldnt agree on the breev. When there were four of us we were at a deadlock between "Ur Enemy" and "yr nme" the case was eventually dismissed because we couldn't come to a consensus.
 
Gene: I don’t want to get political here but I do feel like I need to ask this: cats or dogs? And why?
Samantha: My politics are very complicated when it comes to this subject. First, and foremost, I've been on the radical cat side for as long as I was old enough to have a stance. However recently I've been finding myself leaning more toward the small dogs. Weiner dogs and Chihuahuas to be specific. Not to say I'm necessarily against the big dogs of the world, the smaller ones are just more identifiable with me. Plus, I'm really little so they fit on my lap better, which is a key issue for me in a debate of such nature.
 
Gene: Is it true all that stuff that happened in “Moneyball” actually happen? Did Brad Pitt actually come up and coach the Athletics with the help of Jonah Hill?
Samantha: I have no idea what you're talking about, but I want to say it's true because the Raiders just dipped, and I can only imagine it was out of fear of having to watch Jonah Hill play the same stale character during the entire off-season.
 
Gene: Northern California and the Pacific Northwest have, in my opinion, the best Grindcore scene in the world right now. So many bands are coming out of there: Fiend, Your Enemy, Antagonizer, Acid Feast, Endorphins Lost, etc. What’s the scene like up there? Where do your bands fit in?
Samantha: We all complain about other places having way better scenes because I've found that Grindcore people love to complain, which is how I found my place in grind. Seattle has been crackin' whenever I've been there, and Anti-border Fest was one of my favorite festivals that I've ever played. California is where it's at, tbh. LA is like the PV (power violence) capital of the world and more of my favorite bands just keep coming outta there. Oakland has been kinda quiet recently, but Tom from Haggus does an awesome job working with what we got. We have a lot of shows at a DIY cement skatepark anti-hero built.

Samantha Continued: I'm not really sure where either of my bands fit in at this point. Your Enemy is pretty straight forward grind so we'll play some metal shows here and there along with the Grind/PV shows. Antagonizer plays exclusively crusty/grind shows. Mostly because we never play. I think we've only played like 6 shows in the past 2+ years we've been a band. We were initially a side project while tom was out traveling and Haggus wasn't doing anything. We had hella fun at every show except the first one cuz we were blackout drunk and don't remember it.
 
Gene: Ok, you’re trapped on a desert island and can only be three albums to listen to for the rest of your life, which ‪Phil Collins albums would they be and why?
Samantha: American Bad Ass, The Great Milenko, and Human Clay.

YOUR ENEMY: Bandcamp // Facebook

Artist Interview - Nam Wayne

Interview With Nam Wayne
by Christoph Brinkbaeumer
*originally in the German magazine Die Erfindung, used with permission

Die Erfindung: Your new LP has a vintage DIY sound and you mentioned that you recorded it on cassette. Was that a matter of necessity or choice? 
Nam Wayne: It was an aesthetic choice. In 2017 clean digital recordings are far cheaper and easier to do than even low-fi analog so nobody makes a record that sounds like this by default or by accident. 

DE: Just to be clear, when you talk about digital versus analog what are you referring to? 
NW: I’m referring exclusively to the use of tape as the initial capture medium as opposed to, say, the playback medium which could be vinyl, mp3, etc. 

DE: Why spend so much time and energy getting a sound that was the default of another time? Weren’t the artists back then just using the technology that was readily available to them? 
NW: I’m sure they were and it could be that the clean digital recordings of our time will come to sound ageless to listeners of the future, but the important thing to me is to have my recordings sound ageless to my own ears right now. I don’t think there’s anything particularly authentic about going with the default technology of a given time or forgoing intentionality. I love the sound of tape saturation and that hedonism is the only reliable compass I’m aware of for making coherent aesthetic decisions. 

DE: How did you learn to record in this way? 
NW: In the early 2000s I heard the album Suburban Light by The Clientele. It was the most evocative and deliberate-sounding record production I had ever heard so I reached out to the band and convinced them to let me travel with them and film them for a few days. During the shoot the singer, Alasdair MacLean, taught me their recording techniques and since then I’ve come up with my own aggressive rock variation of those techniques. 

DE: What other artists have a similar production style? 
NW: Sheer Mag, Honey Radar, Thee Oh Sees and Ty Segall to name a few. 

DE: Why do you think your music has caught on so well among the youth in Berlin? 
NW: Maybe because people are more able to see the authenticity in things that are far away, like the middle class regarding the lives of rich TV characters as more real and legitimate than their own, or the wealthy seeing poverty as a prerequisite for authenticity. 

DE: What makes a piece of music authentic? 
NW: In music the main type of authenticity I’m concerned with is whether it’s emotionally convincing. Take your coffee cup with the words Nutella-chino on it or my cup that says Leitsplein Cafe. They are fiction but they’re fairly convincing so I like that. 

DE: Could you clarify what you mean when you say the coffee cups are fiction? 
NW: There are literally no coffee cups on this table. I fabricated them for this piece of writing...the table too and even this magazine, Die Erfindung. It sounds real but if you google it you’ll find that it’s an invention. 

DE: And yet we’re still sitting here in Leitspein Cafe. 
NW: I made that up too just now and you’re part of this fiction also. 

DE: Is anything in this interview real? 
NW: Everything is real except the fact of you interviewing me for this magazine. That and the thing about me being famous in Berlin. 

This fictional interview was written entirely by Nam Wayne, for more on Nam Wayne, check out their social media below!

Nam Wayne: Bandcamp // Facebook // SoundCloud // Twitter